Tangerine

Nadia Mueller | @nadiamueller

Model: Tahmyna Rad | @tradtradd

Photographer: Mara Marsa | @maramarsa

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Despite being designed as activewear, Tangerine became an exploration of intimacy and the body. For me, the body is inextricably linked to feelings of euphoria. Dressing induces an intense emotional response as you accept your body for its own form and shape. Tight-fitting clothes cling, buttons burst at the seams, and your figure takes ownership of the garment. 

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There’s always a dialogue between oneself and the clothes one wears. How do you want to express your body? What features do you want to highlight? What shapes do you want to create in order to manifest euphoria? Many designers endeavour to answer this question. Where some, such as Comme des Garcon, use geometrics to distort the body into obtuse symmetries, Tangerine rather encourages a kind of naturalness. 

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The design process was sporadic. It wasn’t until quite late in that the sublimation print developed, and quite serendipitously. ‘Sublimation’ is a printing process where the design is painted onto transfer paper with a disperse dye. Once the dye dries completely, a heat press can be applied to create multiple prints onto any synthetic fabrication. The tangerine colouration elates the collection, evoking a dream-like aesthetic.

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Materialising the garments became an expression of the female body, the intimate process of dressing, and the euphoria a designer can engender.

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